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On Dog-Loving Misanthropes
Druid wolf pack chasing bull elk; Doug Smith; December 2007

On Dog-Loving Misanthropes

There is a particular personality type that I have come to really dislike: that of the dog-loving misanthrope.

This kind of person believes that dogs are superior to humans, at a moral-spiritual level. They believe that dogs are more loyal than people, will never betray you, and are not cruel in the manner that humans can be. They look on dogs as faithful companions, who love unconditionally, unlike the fickle, incompetent, and malevolent human.

I have always found this personality-type to be un-self-aware, and as a result, ungrateful. One can imagine a kind of self-hatred in their ungratefulness — after all, they themselves are not dogs (much as they might wish to be).

But there is a deeper naivete in their canophilic misanthropy, which is this: the dogs they love were made by humans.

Human nature, with all of its “virtues” and “vices,” is the product of pack-existence. Our ancestors functioned in a manner very similar to wolves — or, perhaps more aptly, like crows, but the group hunting/scavenging character traits still apply. Wolves in nature are as ruthless, as status-positioning, and as cunning as any human — they only lack the intelligence to actualize their intention in the manner of their hominid cousins.

A relatively recent example: ten years ago in Montana, three wolves killed 120 sheep in a single night. They did not eat anything. They simply killed them for sport:

They were running, getting chewed on, bit and piled into a corner. They were bit on the neck, on the back, on the back of the hind leg. They’d cripple them, then rip their sides open.

– Jon Konan, Rancher

Exempting the chihuahua, all modern dog breeds are descended from wolves. What made domestic dogs so loyal, so friendly, so unconditional in their love and devotion?

Humans.

Domestic dogs were the creation of man, reflecting all that he thought desirable in a companion. They are, in other words, reflections of man’s better self.

The dog-loving misanthrope believes he is seeing something other than man in his domestic dogs, which are uncomplicated in their character — simpler to understand than humans. But what he is really seeing is dog created in man’s image. One might even say he is seeing man as he imagines himself, and this is no more true than it is of the dog-loving misanthrope in particular, who seems to imagine that he or she embodies all of the virtues of the domesticated dog, but none of the vices of man.

The judgmental frame which looks down upon man and deems him essentially morally “bad” is, incidentally, also an imperfect creation of mankind, but that is a discussion for another time. Suffice to say for now, the dog-loving misanthrope is himself an immoral creature, un-self-aware, ungrateful, and perhaps delusional in their virtue. They shrug off the challenge and the obligation to understand other human beings as humans, in favor of a simpler, easier alternative, custom-designed by the humans they hate for their own gratification.

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